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  • | Jewish Foodie

    Southeast (Bible Belt) The first Jewish community In Arkansas, right next to Tennessee, was established only in 1866. It was called "Children of Israel." It is a small community of about 2,000 members, concentrated mainly in four cities: Little Rock (the capital), where about 70% of the Jewish population lives, Fayetteville, Bentonville, and Hot Springs. Arkansas is located in the south of the United States, and is considered one of the poorest states in the Union. The most famous figure to emerge from this conservative region is Bill Clinton, the former President of the United States. Ori starts his journey here at a local bakery, Ambrosia, where he meets Mili, who used to live in Israel, and now owns a bakery where she sells Jewish pastries. From there, he continues to Hot Springs. The visit closes with a Friday dinner where typical southern food is served. Arkansas Episodes The Jewish community of

  • | Jewish Foodie

    The mountain countries Wyoming, located in the midwestern United States, has the smallest population of the 50 states. The state has many natural resources, minerals, fertile land, and extensive agriculture. Millions of tourists visit its national parks and breathtaking views every year. About 1,150 Jews live in Wyoming, most of them in the city of Shayne and Jackson Hall, which is a place of pilgrimage for ski enthusiasts and lovers of nature. Wyoming is almost entirely a nature reserve, where hunting and fishing are popular sports. Ori visits the Jewish community to understand how it preserves its Jewish tradition and the difficulties of obtaining and cooking kosher food. He will cook with members of the Jewish community and see how they manage to integrate local cuisine with traditional Jewish cooking. Wyoming Episodes The Jewish community of

  • | Jewish Foodie

    North East The story of Jewish food begins in the "Big Apple," the city that served as the destination for the first Jews who came to North America in 1654, and later for the millions of Jews who came to North America as part of the great waves of migration from Central and Eastern Europe. In the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century, many of the Jews who arrived in New York took up residence in the Lower East Side of Manhattan. This is where Ori begins his acquaintance with Jewish food in America, an area with a rich Jewish history. In episodes 2 and3, Ori will also be introduced to contemporary Jewish food in areas such as Coney Island and Brooklyn. New York Episodes The Jewish community of

  • | Jewish Foodie

    South-West Every American knows that "in Texas, everything is bigger." Texas is the largest state in the continental United States, and Texans are proud of their heritage which includes cowboys, farms, and southern culture. Because of its unique characteristics, Texans have developed a unique cuisine that includes an abundance of meat and barbecue-style cooking. Ori visits the Jews of the Lone Star State, and meat restaurants serving Texas meat and food with a unique Jewish spin one would not expect. Texas Episodes The Jewish community of

  • | Jewish Foodie

    Southeast (Bible Belt) Jewish history in Memphis can be traced to the first half of the 19th century. Although this is generally a very Christian area, it has a large Jewish community of about 21,800 people, many of them Orthodox, belonging to the Baron Hirsch Congregation. Tennessee is a state identified with country music, bourbon (whiskey), and fried food. On his visit to Tennessee, Ori meets and eats with community members and understands how the Jews created their own interpretations of southern food. Tennessee Episodes The Jewish community of

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